Health Equity and Power: Misogynoir and Black Women’s Health

Society for Health Psychology Virtual Programming Series
hosted by the SfHP Women’s Health Interest Group and co-sponsored by the Society of Clinical Psychology, APA Division 12
Registration will close at 5:00 pm Eastern time on Monday, May 10.

Presenter: Dr. Vanessa V. Volpe, PhD

Assistant Professor of Psychology at North Carolina State University, Diversity Scholar, University of Michigan National Center for Institutional Diversity, Director of the Black Health Lab at North Carolina State University
Dr. Volpe is an applied health psychologist with a focus on the reduction of racial health disparities by employing critical psychological and social justice lenses. Her research aims to explicate the processes by which and the contexts in which individuals resist and protect themselves against forms of individual-, cultural- and structural-level marginalization (e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism), with specific attention to the preservation of health for Black individuals and communities. Her most recent applied health psychology research has focused on 1) structural racism, 2) media, technology, and online processes, and 4) awareness of health disparities.

 

Overview:

This event will describe the pervasive threat of misogynoir for health equity for Black women. We will discuss examples of how misogynoir manifests in health psychology contexts, the ways in which our positionalities shape our perceptions of Black women, and concrete actions to disrupt misogynoir for health equity at multiple levels of the social-ecological system. The target audience for this workshop are psychologists who are interested in learning more about Black-White racial disparities in women’s health and how they can be addressed (intermediate level). Please note that we will not be focusing on reproductive health or maternal health, although examples specific to these contexts will be mentioned.

 

Learning Objectives:

(1) identify how positionality shapes the way you perceive Black women and how these perceptions, combined with the power you have in your professional position, disrupts and/or contributes to health inequities, and
(2) define misogynoir and identify potential actions for health equity for Black women at multiple levels (e.g., individual, interpersonal, community, institutional, structural, cultural).
Category:

Description

Society for Health Psychology Virtual Programming Series
hosted by the SfHP Women’s Health Interest Group and co-sponsored by the Society of Clinical Psychology, APA Division 12
FOR SCP MEMBERS ONLY – EMAIL DIV12APA@GMAIL.COM FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Registration will close at 5:00 pm Eastern time on Monday, May 10.

Presenter: Dr. Vanessa V. Volpe, PhD

Assistant Professor of Psychology at North Carolina State University, Diversity Scholar, University of Michigan National Center for Institutional Diversity, Director of the Black Health Lab at North Carolina State University
Dr. Volpe is an applied health psychologist with a focus on the reduction of racial health disparities by employing critical psychological and social justice lenses. Her research aims to explicate the processes by which and the contexts in which individuals resist and protect themselves against forms of individual-, cultural- and structural-level marginalization (e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism), with specific attention to the preservation of health for Black individuals and communities. Her most recent applied health psychology research has focused on 1) structural racism, 2) media, technology, and online processes, and 4) awareness of health disparities.

 

Overview:

This event will describe the pervasive threat of misogynoir for health equity for Black women. We will discuss examples of how misogynoir manifests in health psychology contexts, the ways in which our positionalities shape our perceptions of Black women, and concrete actions to disrupt misogynoir for health equity at multiple levels of the social-ecological system. The target audience for this workshop are psychologists who are interested in learning more about Black-White racial disparities in women’s health and how they can be addressed (intermediate level). Please note that we will not be focusing on reproductive health or maternal health, although examples specific to these contexts will be mentioned.

 

Learning Objectives:

(1) identify how positionality shapes the way you perceive Black women and how these perceptions, combined with the power you have in your professional position, disrupts and/or contributes to health inequities, and
(2) define misogynoir and identify potential actions for health equity for Black women at multiple levels (e.g., individual, interpersonal, community, institutional, structural, cultural).